Three Facts of Sin and Three Facts of Salvation

We learn much from the power of sin in King David’s life. Like black velvet against which a jeweler displays his diamonds, sin’s dark penalty, power, and price make the three facts of salvation shine brighter. First, Jesus Christ has removed the penalty of sin. Second, the Holy Spirit is more powerful than the power of sin. The third fact of salvation is that in the sight of God the stains of sin are washed away by forgiveness.

Kings and Prophets

The history books of Kings and Chronicles tell us about what resulted from Israel not wanting God to be their king. In these books, we will find awesome warnings in the lives of the wicked kings, and we find great examples in the lives of godly prophets like Elijah and Elisha. In 1 Kings, we learn about the division of that human kingdom. In 2 Kings, we learn the details of their sad captivities and God’s grace and patience.

The Rise and Fall of the Kingdom

We will learn valuable lessons from Israel’s history that will give hope and encourage endurance, especially when encountering spiritual failures. In spite of the nation’s idolatry, God was very patient with His people. Every time the work of God ran into an obstacle, God raised up a prophet. Being God’s instrument to remove obstacles that blocked the work of God was a chief role or function of the prophets.

Things Omitted

The books of Chronicles cover the same period of history that the books of Samuel and Kings cover. Chronicles means “Things Omitted.” The books spotlight God’s divine perspective on Hebrew history and the kings who were instrumental in bringing about revival, restoration, and reformation. The key to understanding the Chronicles is this: God’s ways are not our ways, and His thoughts are not our thoughts.

The Synoptic Gospels of the Old Testament

The first return from the Babylonian captivity was to rebuild the temple under Ezra’s leadership. Ezra is a great example of godly leadership and this lesson explains how and why God uses a man like Ezra. The books of Ezra and Nehemiah, along with Esther, are known as the post-captivity history books. Ezra and Nehemiah are very similar books. They both teach principles of leadership and of doing God’s work in God’s way.

The Work of God and Forces Opposing God's Work

The book of Ezra teaches us that many times adversities are the sign of approval that the work of God is being carried out. But Ezra’s message is not about being defeated or distracted by opposition. There are many principles we learn from Ezra, and they can be summed up: It is the Plan of God to use the Power of God in the People of God to accomplish the Purposes of God according to the Plan of God.

The Profile of a Leader

The book of Nehemiah shows us seven practical principles of leadership to do God’s work. Nehemiah demonstrated great strength, commitment, understanding, focus, courage, perseverance and complete dedication to doing God’s work God’s way. These principles from the life of Nehemiah show us how to be available for God’s use, because it is the Plan of God to use the Power of God in the People of God to accomplish the Purposes of God according to the Plan of God.

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?

See God through the life of Esther, the story of a Hebrew woman who married a Gentile and saved the Jewish people from genocide, preserving the ancestry of the Messiah. One of the most important themes of Esther is God’s sovereign care over the lives of His people, even when our circumstances are painful or difficult and how He causes all things to work for the good for those called according to His purposes.

The Outward Man and the Inward Man

God’s Word includes five poetry books, also known as “wisdom books” or “the writings”: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon. In these books, God speaks to the hearts of His people when they are suffering (Job), worshipping (Psalms), coping with the decisions of daily life (Proverbs), doubting (Ecclesiastes), and expressing the intimacies of marriage (Song of Solomon). God’s desire is for us to be changed from the inside out.

Hurting Hearts

The Book and life of Job gives us a great perspective on how to face our own suffering and trials. God’s people have always suffered. Life is difficult and perplexing, and becoming a Christian does not take us out of our troubles. But God has a message for us when our hearts are hurting: Pain and suffering are inevitable, but misery is optional. That is the message of the book of Job.

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